Drug DUIs

When licensed drivers who apply for and accept the privilege to drive a motor vehicle in the state of Arizona, it is implied that they automatically consent to be tested by law enforcement officers who are investigating whether or not you were driving while under the influence (DUI) of alcohol or drugs.

It is unlawful in the state of Arizona for any person who is under the influence of alcohol or drugs to drive or be in actual physical control of any motor vehicle. In order to understand the ramifications of DUI arrests in Phoenix or Tempe it is important that you should consult experienced Arizona DUI lawyers like those associated with the Law Offices of Craig W. Penrod, P.C.

There are many conditions that can affect the ability of a driver to operate a motor vehicle even after one drink. The best rule to follow is that If you drink alcoholic beverages, do not drive. If you are under the influence of drugs, prescription or otherwise, do not drive.

As mentioned earlier, when a person becomes licensed to operate a motor vehicle in the state of Arizona, they are consenting to have their blood tested to determine their blood alcohol concentration (BAC) or drug content if you are arrested for DUI. This is known as the implied consent provision of state law.

If you are stopped for DUI and a test shows that you have a BAC of 0.08 percent or more (a BAC of 0.04 percent for the driver of a commercial vehicle requiring a commercial driver license) or if a blood alcohol or drug test result is not available, you will lose your driving privilege on the spot. In addition, it's likely that you will be required to complete alcohol or drug screening before you can obtain a restricted driving permit or to reinstate your driver's license.

It is important that you understand that it's possible for a person to be found guilty of DUI involving any drug or its metabolite even though their BAC was less than 0.08 percent. If a driver is under the age of 21, their driver's license may be suspended if there is any alcohol concentration above 0.00 percent, otherwise known as zero tolerance.

If a person refuses to submit to or does not successfully complete any tests when they are arrested for DUI, they will automatically lose your driving privilege for 12 months or for 24 months if this is their second test refusal within a period of 84 months. In addition, a person will be required to complete alcohol or drug screening before they can obtain a restricted permit or reinstate their driving privileges.

In addition to any criminal penalties imposed by the court for a second or third offense DUI violation, driving privileges will be automatically revoked.

It is important that your DUI legal situation should be handled by expert professionals with the experience possessed by the attorneys at the Law Offices of Craig W. Penrod, P.C.